Our weekend getaway to picturesque Paternoster

The joys of pretty-as-a-picture Paternoster

Today we’re heading up South Africa’s West Coast to the seaside village of Paternoster. It’s about a two-hour drive from Cape Town to one of the oldest fishing villages in the country. Legend has it it’s called Paternoster (our father in latin) because of the prayers said by shipwrecked Portuguese sailors. Luckily for us there was no risk of shipwreck, just beautiful beaches, amazing food and chill time.

Paternoster is literally dazzling with its white-washed fisherman’s cottages, wide sandy beaches and sparkling azure seas – and that perfect light. Definitely a feel of the Greek islands here. It’s known for its crayfish and is a pillar in the South African commercial fishing industry. It’s also known for the Paternoster Hotel which was built in 1863, and its infamous Panty Bar.

Paternoster: Hotel

Quick beer stop at the Paternoster Hotel

Cheers from the Panty Bar

The Panty Bar once served as the town jail before becoming a bar. In 1974 Johan Carosini started his collection of ‘Honeymoon Panties’, suspending panties in all shapes and colours from the ceiling.

In 1983 the collection was taken down after a priest reported it to the police as an unholy practice. The unfortunate policeman responsible for confiscating the collection quickly became known as Panty Basson! I can almost hear the villagers chuckling!

Giorgelli Carosini (son of Johan), who now co-owns the hotel, started collecting again in the nineties. As you walk into the bar you can’t miss the impressive range of panties hanging from the ceiling. It’s slightly disconcerting and you don’t want your imagination to wander too much as to where those panties may have been! Rather order a glass of Castle Light draught and head outside to get in a Paternoster state of mind. Well, that’s what we did.

Paternoster: panty bar

The panties are displayed hanging from the ceiling

It doesn’t take long to ease into that Paternoster pace. Or long to find your way to our next stop – Gaaitjie. Just head for the sea and you’ll see the signs and find a gorgeous, rustic white-washed restaurant on the edge of the beach. Gaaitjie is a heavenly place for lunch – you can read more about the delicious seafood we enjoyed by clicking here.

Paternoster: Gaaitje

The stunning view from Gaaitjie

Paternoster: Gaaitje

Rose by the beach at Gaaitjie

Home from home at Smuggler’s Cottage

Replete after our beachside repast we headed to our home for the weekend – the delightful Smuggler’s Cottage. (Smuggies as we now affectionately call it). The attractive guesthouse is set a couple of minutes walk from a beautiful beach. It has a lovely pool area where we soon settled in with a bottle of chilled Rose for some sunshine hours. And I posted this picture on instagram posing the question ‘Where in the world am I?’. I got wide range of suggestions. Greece, Spain, Cape Town (close – though I suspect that was from someone who knew I was in Cape Town), Portugal, the Med, somewhere in the Aegean – even Cornwall(!). My favourite response, however was: ‘I don’t know where you are but I wish I was there!’ Yeah, get that.

Paternoster: Smugglers Cottage

Chilling out pool-side at Smuggler’s Cottage

Smuggies has comfortable ensuite rooms with  tea and coffee making facilities, hairdryer (and hair straighteners, too – a first for me) and lovely large bathrooms. There’s a wonderful warm welcome and friendly efficient service. And we enjoyed a fabulous breakfast on the terrace framed by the beautiful bougainvillea.

Paternoster: Breakfast

Enjoying breakfast under the bougainvilleas

Creative dining at Wolfgat

The main reason for this foray westwards was to eat at Wolfgat restaurant. It’s ranked 13th in South Africa on the 2017 Eat Out Mercedes Benz Restaurant Awards. A huge achievement considering it’s not in a major city and South Africa’s restaurantland is incredibly competitive.

The restaurant is in a 130-year old building with fabulous views across the sea. The seven-course menu is inspired by the weather and the surrounding landscape. Dishes include local seaweed,  seasonal veldkos (basically food growing wild that’s been foraged locally) and plants from the garden. Chef Kobus van de Merwe is keen to showcase ingredients gathered from around Wolfgat’s beachside location.

All this certainly makes for an intriguing dining experience. The restaurant seats a maximum of 20 diners (it’s the size of a small house) so there’s an intimate atmosphere and you can easily watch the intricate dishes being prepared.

Paternoster: Wolfgat

Chef Kobus creating another innovative dish

What’s on the menu

There’s a lot to take in and I was certainly challenged with flavours and textures I’d never encountered before. Not all of them were good and I balked at the sight of succulents growing beside the beach the next morning, fearing I may have to eat them for breakfast. Dishes were heavy on the succulent/seaweed front which is certainly novel, if more disconcerting than pleasurable. And some of the flavour combinations tasted decidedly weird to me, like the mussel dish served with a seaweed broth and papaya.

I did really love the bread course which consisted of home-made breadsticks (in a sack) served with a pan of bubbling butter infused with bokkoms and seaweed. Bokkoms are a type of salted and dried local mullet (know as harders). So this was like the best anchovy butter you’ll ever taste – and I love anchovy butter.

Paternoster: Wolfgat

I wanted to lick the pan of bokkom butter

The final course was a wild sage ice-cream with sage ash and nectarines. The nectarines were suspended from a foraged bush which was set on fire at the table. A great piece of theatre unfortunately not backed up with great flavours – it just tasted very ashy. As a result we left with a bad taste in our mouths. Not a good way to end dinner.

Paternoster: Wolfgat

The ashy nectarine tree

Paternoster: Wolfgat

The dessert didn’t look great or taste great either

Eating at Wolfgat is undeniably a memorable experience. The menu changes frequently – obviously I guess as they are dependent on what they find around them to some extent. Perhaps we visited on one of the stranger days. Because let’s be frank, it was all a bit weird – though certainly an entertaining and educational experience. One we are still talking about.

Go and try it for yourself if you dare!

Wolfgat only seats 20 guests – as a result you need to book and pay in advance. Dinner costs R750 (around £44 at today’s exchange rate).

Take me to the beach

There’s no shortage of sandy shores in Paternoster. You can walk to a selection of them from anywhere in the town. We couldn’t resist driving to the more remote Tietiesbaai (for obvious reasons, who can resist such a name). Along a dusty road over the hill you get to this beautifully unspoilt beach which is a favourite camping spot.

Paternoster: Tietiesbaai

The blue bay that is Tietiesbaai

Paternoster: Tietiesbaai

Always happiest in the sun on the beach!

Feet in the sand at Seekombuis

On the way back from Tieitiesbaai to Paternoster town you pass Seekombuis (it means sea kitchen in Afrikaans), a ramshackle building on the beach – another place that seemed to be calling our names. Whatever you do, don’t pass it, you simply have to stop for a while and chill at this beautifully basic beach bar.

Paternoster: Seekombuis

Welcome to the rustic, beach-side Seekombuis

We sipped chilled beers in the sunshine with our feet in the sand, wishing we had time to stay for lunch and didn’t have to head back home so soon. A blackboard advertised Kreef (crayfish) salad for R65 (£3.80) and Peri Peri kreef starter for R70 (£4.00). I’m still regretting missing out on such a bargain kreef experience.

They’ve converted little row boats into seats and it looks so pretty and everything’s so peaceful with its beautiful sea views and not a building in sight. Seriously hard to tear ourselves away.

Paternoster: Seekombuis

Boat tables and benches on the beach

Paternoster: Seekombuis

Even in the bar you have your feet in the sand

We found it so hard to leave Paternoster – it just felt like we hadn’t spent enough time. Luckily there were several shops on the way out so we had an excuse to stop and prolong our stay, even if  only for a little longer.

Die Winkel Op Paternoster (a winkel is a shop in case you hadn’t gathered) has a quaint collection of souvenirs, clothes and random stuff and is great to browse in. All the shops have a certain charm, so I’d pop into them all. I guarantee you’ll find something that you didn’t know you needed and just have to take it home.

Paternoster: Die Winkel

Pop in to the shop for some souvenirs

I bought some beautiful shell hearts which I’m looking forward to hanging in my garden in London. Because I know every time I look at them I will be transported back to happy days in Paternoster. And reminded that I need to organise my next trip there – and this time it will be for longer, that’s for sure.

Have you been to Paternoster or somewhere similar? Did you discover some magical place that brought you such happiness and made you promise to return? I’d love to hear about it. 

 

 

Tasty seafood and stunning views at Gaaitje in Paternoster

The beach-side charm of Gaaitjie

Today we’re heading up South Africa’s West Coast to the charming seaside town of Paternoster at Cape Columbine. Known for its crayfish and white-washed fisherman’s cottages it’s a picture perfect little spot that appears in the distance as you come over that final hill. More about what to do in this beautiful place later. But first we are getting down to the important business of lunch. After our two-hour drive from Cape Town we were ready for some refreshment so we headed straight for the sea in search of Gaaitjie (which mysteriously means little hole in Afrikaans).

Gaaitje is quite simply the perfect restaurant for me. A basic white-washed fisherman’s cottage right on the beach serving food made using fresh local produce. And no holes in sight. Just expansive beach and ocean views.

Gaatijie: view

Welcome to Gaaitjie, beautiful in shades of blue and white

What’s on the menu

We settled in happily on the verandah with a bottle of Rose to peruse the menu which offered a lot of delicious fishy favourites. The local calamari came with charred corn, pickled red onion and garlic aioli. The prettiest of plates with calamari that literally melted in the mouth. Wow! Calamari will never taste like this again…

Gaaitjie: Calamari

Beautifully tender calamari with a slight crunch

My Saldanah Bay mussels were in a white wine broth with cumin and lime leaves, garlic and onions. I’ve eaten so many mussels in my time in Cape Town I’m thinking of writing a guide to mussel dishes around the peninsular! They are so tasty at this time of year and so versatile. Today’s choice came in a curry-style broth which I’ve never had with mussels before and it worked beautifully. I mopped up all those juices with our wonderful rosemary pot bread.

Gaaitjie: mussels

Plump mussels in a curry-flavoured broth

The special of the day was written up on the board as we walked in – Masala prawns. No need for Terry to look at the menu then, Indian flavours are his favourite. The prawns were enormous, juicy and beautifully spicy and served on the tastiest of savoury rice.

Gaaitjie: prawns

Giant masala prawns with savoury rice

To complement our meal these delightful little pot breads were delivered to our table piping hot from the oven. Soft and delicate, the fresh butter melted in creating little bites of heavenliness – all flavoured with fresh rosemary. It’s almost worth going to Gaaitjie just for the bread!

Gaaitjie: tin bread

Stunning little loaves of tin bread

The food at Gaaitjie is both simple and perfect. The best ingredients wonderfully cooked, a warm welcome and great service and those views! I want to go back there right now!

Gaaitjie: front

Gaaitje in its shades of blue

Gaaitjie: boat

The Gaaitje boat at the front of the restaurant

 

Gaaitjie: interior

Inside there’s a lovely beach-house feel

Today’s price point

Lunch for three which consisted of two starters, a main course and a bottle of Rose cost R565 (£34 at todays exchange rate).

As a general guide starters are around R80 (4.80) and main courses up to R200 (£12).

Gaaitje is off Sampson Street on the beach in Paternoster.

Peninsular touring and seafood at Live Bait

Cape Town is frequently ranked one of the most beautiful cities in the world in those never-ending Best of… lists that pop up everywhere. I’ve spent a lot of time here – I know, lucky me – and it’s pretty much impossible to beat, there’s so much going for it. .

It’s scenically stunning and diverse with myriad beautiful beaches, the ever-present majesty of Table Mountain, forests, mountain trails and gardens and some of the most stunning drives you’ll ever experience. It has a warmth to its soul, a great energy and welcoming people. There are hundreds of fabulous restaurants which are great value – and of course there’s all that wine that has to be sampled.

I was recently reminded that African penguins live here (I didn’t mention the wildlife yet, did I?) so the purpose of today’s outing was to say hi them at Boulder’s Beach in Simon’s Town. I think I’ve been suffering from penguin withdrawal!

Our journey took us from Sea Point to the other side of the peninsular. It’s a magnificent drive through Camp’s Bay, past Llandudno and over Chapman’s Peak. The road clings precariously to the mountainside –  an amazing feat of engineering – and the sea shimmers down below.

Live Bait: Chapman's Peak Drive

Chapman’s Peak Drive, one of the most stunning drives ever

Once you start your descent Noordhoek Beach appears on your right. It doesn’t matter how many times I’ve seen it, and even though I know it’s coming, the view elicits an involuntary gasp. And I always wonder who lives in that house! What a view they must have.

Once you’ve crossed over the peninsular it’s a slow meander through sleepy seaside towns to penguin-land on Boulder Beach. Hello little penguins! I felt instantly happier on seeing them.

Live Bait: Penguins

African penguins lap up the warmth of the sun

Penguin fix sorted we headed back towards Cape Town Central following the coast road until we got to Muizenberg. Famous for its beautiful beach and warm Indian Ocean (the other side of the peninsular sits on the Atlantic and is decidedly chilly), Muizenberg is considered the birthplace of surfing in South Africa. There’s a big surfing community here all centred around Surfer’s Corner. Which is where we’re headed – for a spot of beach-side lunch at Live Bait.

Live Bait is right in the middle of all the action with a long glass front looking out over the sea. It’s a beautifully blue view and there’s plenty of surf-related action to observe. Inside it has a rustic beach house feel which so perfectly matches the surrounding seaside vibe. There’s a lot of fish on the menu and a great selection of sushi which is freshly made in front of you.

Our delectable light lunch today started with a portion of Thai fish cakes to share. Shaped more like fish balls, they were lovely and light with well-balanced Thai flavours and a nice crunch.

Live Bait: Fish cakes

Soft and flavourful fish cakes with Asian flavours

For mains we shared a portion of tempura prawns – and a very generous one it was, too. Served with crispy fries, the prawns were perfectly cooked in the light batter and served with a dipping mayo. We asked for some chilli and mixed it into the mayo, making for a delightful spicy hit.

Live Bait: tempura prawns

The large pan of juicy tempura prawns

Live Bait: Prawn tempura

Close up on the delicious prawn crunch

There’s a relaxed vibe at Live Bait, it’s the sort of place I could see myself spending many an hour drinking wine, feeling fine and absorbing some of that Muizenberg chilled-out surfing attitude.

Live Bait: Interior

Beautiful blues and whites inside and out

Live Bait: Beach house

There’s a beach house feel throughout

This is your sea view. Which goes on  much further on both the left and right of this picture.

Live Bait: Muizenberg beach

Looking out at beautiful Muizenberg beach

While Muizenberg is great for swimming and surfing, it’s also home to Great White Sharks (more wildlife)! The area is well monitored though with shark spotters on high and at the beach who seem to know where the sharks are. I’ve been on the beach when the shark siren goes and it is a bit of a scary experience if any of your party happen to be in the sea. That Jaws music creeps into your subconscious! There are experts on hand to tell you about these powerful creatures and there’s plenty of shark-related advice posted all over the place (in several languages). Like how to be shark smart – do remember not to swim at night or if bleeding! The presence of the Great Whites certainly adds to the Muizenberg adventure.

Live Bait: Sharks

Beware of the sharks!

Oh and before I go, here I am with my latest penguin friends.

I can’t imagine there’s another journey more filled with beautiful views, lovely food and exotic wildlife. What joy – Cape Town I love you!

Live Bait: Boulders Beach

Me visiting the African penguins on Boulders Beach

Today’s price point

Starters range from R45-R85 (£2.70-£5.10)

Main courses range from R99 to R225 (£6.00-£13.60)

White wine starts from R125 (£7.50) a bottle and red wine from R130 (£7.85)

All conversions are at the today’s exchange rate.

Live Bait is at 70 Beach Road, Muizenberg

Great foodie shopping at Cape Town’s Oranjezicht Market

Today we’re heading to beautiful Granger Bay close to Cape Town’s Waterfront. How I love a food market and the Oranjezicht farmers market is absolutely fabulous. It’s a community farmers-style market for independent local farmers and artisanal food producers that’s set overlooking the sparkling sea.

There’s plenty of seating where you can relax and munch on the many dishes available and a wide range of stalls to delight. The tempting displays definitely make me buy more, but as I love everything I’ve bought there that’s really not a problem.

Oranjezicht farmers market

The market looks out over the azure sea

As you walk in you’re greeted by a fabulous floral display, include vibrant bunches of perfect proteas – South Africa’s national flower.

Oranjezicht farmers market

Beautiful bunches of proteas to take home

Fresh produce

This has got to be the best place in Cape Town to stock up on all the fresh stuff you’re going to need for your week. The fruit and vegetable displays are stunning and everything is of the highest quality. Boxes of fresh figs, massively juicy watermelons, plump grapes, carrots in myriad shades, tomatoes, chillis, herbs, leaves, garlic…well, pretty much whatever that’s seasonal and delicious. Make sure you take a bag – you’re not going to be able to carry it all if you don’t! I think I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves.

Oranjezicht farmers market

Chillis in different shapes, sizes and colours

Oranjezicht farmers market

How’s this for a vegetable display…almost makes me want to become vegetarian

More chillis to add spice to your life

A fresh herb selection and beans that are purple and yellow

Oranjezicht farmers market

Heirloom tomatoes – juicily bursting with flavour

A table full of squash is a work of art

Oranjezicht farmers market

Love the pink oyster mushrooms…and you can even grow your own

Some of the wonderful fruit on offer

There’s also plenty of great-quality meat, cheese, bread, fish and sauces available.

Snacking opportunities and takeaways

As well as all the fresh produce there’s so much to tuck into at once to keep your shopping strength up – or to take home for later feasting. Baked goods, fresh bread, samosas, sushi, pies, wraps, Vietnamese rolls, eggs Benedict, steak rolls in many forms, bacon and egg croissants, bagels..it’s astounding. Here’s a small selection of what’s on offer.

Oranjezicht farmers market

You’ll find plenty of sweet treats to indulge in

Perfect little pies made in a muffin pan

Oranjezicht farmers market

The sweetest and most custardy of Portuguese custard tarts

Oranjezicht farmers market

The chefs are busy with bacon and potato rosti

Oranjezicht farmers market

The colourful sushi selection is described with passion

The prettiest of plants are also on display

Oranjezicht market

There’s a lot of eating on the go happening here

This is some market – seriously, I could go every week and take a batch of pictures like this showcasing different products – there’s so much on offer here. My advice is to go and see for yourself – and go soon, cos you’re going to want to go back again and again.

You’ll find the Oranjezicht City Farm Market at Granger Bay Boulevard, V&A Waterfront, Cape town.

It is open every Saturday from 9am to 2pm.

Read more about the Oranjezicht City farm by clicking here.

 

Classically perfect pasta at Morgenster

I’m taking my job very seriously this month and trying to bring you news and lovely pictures from a range of Cape Winelands eateries. So today we’ve popped in for a casual mid-week lunch at 95 at Morgenster.

Morgenster is a thriving wine and olive farm which dates back to 1711. They are known for their Bourdeaux-style blends and their Italian Collection wines. All of which are fabulous. Plus they offer a  top range of olive oils.

The restaurant 95 at Morgenster is the baby of Italian chef Giorgio Nava, whose lovely original restaurant, 95 Keerom, is in  central Cape Town. The menu is inspired by the food of Milan and there’s a good selection of salads, antipasti, pasta and meat dishes.

Our taste buds got awakened by the sound of all the pasta dishes. My homemade ravioli of slow baked Karoo lamb shoulder was served with sage butter and parmesan. One of those pasta dishes that makes you want to sigh with delight with every mouthful. The richness and softness of the lamb, the flavoursome pasta pillows and that amazingly silken butter sauce. Truly a pasta dish to dream about.

Luscious ravioli in sage butter

You can’t beat a classic Italian dish perfectly done. The handmade tagliatelle came with a slow cooked beef ragu and fresh herbs. You can tell just by looking at this picture that it was a lovingly prepared ragu with great richness and depth.

Rich and tasty ragu with flavoursome fresh pasta

We actually got to Morgenster a bit early for lunch so settled on the restaurant’s lovely verandah overlooking the dam and mountains and enjoyed a pre-lunch coffee. Love the attention to detail here, with footprints in the foam.

Who left their footprints in the coffee?

You eat in dappled sunlight under a slatted roof (as you can see from the pictures of our lovely pasta dishes). And this is the expansive view of water, mountains and azure sky.

Food always tastes better with a view

Morgenster is at Vergelegen Avenue, off Lourensford Road on the outskirts of Somerset West.

Today’s price point

We paid R320 (about £19 at today’s exchange rate) for two delicious pasta dishes and a bottle of Merlot.

Exploring and indulging on the Franschhoek Wine Tram

As promised, today we’re hopping on board the Franschhoek Wine Tram. There are so many vineyards in Franschhoek in  South Africa’s Cape Winelands it’s quite a daunting task to pick which ones to visit. So someone clever thought about starting up the Wine Tram to make it easier. There are five routes to choose from and seven or eight vineyards that you can hop off at for each one.

We chose the Red Line, which has eight stops – and you have time to get off at a maximum of five. Clearly there is still some decision making to be done. Anyway, select your route and head for the centre of beautiful Franschhoek to start your adventure. It’s worth getting there a little early for a fabulous coffee at Sacred Ground (how’s that for a great name for a coffee shop). Then wait for the bell to ring to announce the start of your tour and for your guide with the red (or whatever the colour of your tour) flag to appear.

It turns out that the Wine Tram tours are mainly on a bus – well the actual tram only visits two stops which happened to be at the end of our tour. But you won’t be disappointed as it’s a particularly cute bus, resplendent in green and gold. The open sides make for easy picture taking and the informative commentary fills you in about the wine life in Franschhoek.

All aboard the wine bus wine tram

We headed out of central Franschhoek towards our first stop Maison. It’s a beautifully quaint little building with a welcoming verandah and tasting area in front. The restaurant – Kitchen at Maison – which is currently rated the eighth best in the country, overlooks vines and mountains.

The quaintest of cottages greets you

There’s a strict timetable to follow which actually makes life easier. Each segment is organised in periods of an hour – so when you’re dropped off watches are synchronised and the bus is back in exactly an hour. You can of course stay two hours (or three, or however long you want). We found that the hour worked really well. The farms are all used to the system and served us quickly and efficiently. So we were ready to head off to the next stop when the bus arrived.

In the garden at Maison – a bit of natural art?

We decided to skip the next two stops – Eikehof and Leopard’s Leap, though I did get the opportunity to capture this stunning sculpture from the bus. No prizes for guessing which vineyard this was at. As well as all its other great qualities, Franschhoek is like a massive outdoor art gallery!

Look out for the leopard prowling on high

Next stop Chamonix which dates back to 1688. The newly opened restaurant which overlooks the forest at the back. We tucked into the cheese and charcuterie boards because you’ve gotta eat if you’re tasting all that wine. They were beautifully presented and tasty, just what we needed.

A tasty cheese selection to keep us going

A delicious charcuterie platter with local meat and cheeses

A short hop and we were off the bus again at spectacular Dieu Donne. It’s a modern construction, set high up on the slopes of Franschhoek with this spectacular view across the valley.

Dieu Donne’s view is one of the most amazing

The bus meanders through the streets of this historic little town – and it really makes you feel like you want to live there (or perhaps that’s due to the wine?). Beautiful views, quaint cottages and a sense of peace – I could picture myself moving into this house!

Picture perfect cottages line the streets

By now the afternoon was starting to run away from us, time really does fly when you’re having fun. Finally it was time for the best bit – the actual tram. We waited excitedly alongside the track as it trundled up. All aboard and we headed for our final stop – Grande Provence.

It’s on the tram for the last two stops

On arrival at the station there’s a tractor and trailers awaiting you which trundle through the vines and trees to a beautiful destination. Grande Provence oozes class and style and there’s a very warm welcome, too.

Love the Franschhoek modes of transport

It’s over 300 years old and has the most spectacular gardens. Beautiful trees, water features and art everywhere for your pleasure. And the wine is great too. We settled in the shady garden with a chilled bottle of Rose. The perfect last stop to complete our day.

The stylish inside tasting area at Grande Provence

The beautiful trees offer shade for the sculptures

More fabulous Franschhoek art to admire

I loved our afternoon on the Wine Tram. We made new friends and sang with them along the way (wine tasting definitely helps with that!), tasted new wines and enjoyed the beauty of the Franschhoek Valley in style. The Bus/Tram works like clockwork and is certainly a novel way to travel.

Homeward bound after a fabulous Winelands afternoon

The vineyards we visited in conclusion

They were all very different, a mix of historical and modern, varying views, food and wine. My opinion in short.

Maison

Quaint and quirky.

Expensive wine tasting.

Highly regarded restaurant, though we didn’t eat in it this time.

Chamonix

Lovely cheese and charcuterie platters.

Delicious Sauvignon Blanc with lots of citrus notes.

Not much of a view.

Dieu Donne

Spectacular views.

More delicious Sauvignon Blanc.

Grande Provence

The classiest of the lot.

Beautiful gardens, water features and sculptures.

Delicious Rose.

Find out more about the fabulous Wine Tram at winetram.co.za