Travel: 24 hours in Brighton

Today we’re heading to Brighton at the seaside, less than an hour by train south of central London. I love train travel and this journey is almost too short, through picturesque quintessentially English countryside to the coast.

I visit whenever I have the chance, which really isn’t often enough. This time it was because my niece Maxine was visiting from Cape Town. Maxine sees a different side of Brighton to me through her dedication to her favourite YouTubers Zoella (Zoe Sugg) and her boyfriend Alfie Deyes who live locally. While I am clearly not their target market I did watch several vlogs with Maxine and can see their appeal.

They have certainly increased Brighton’s popularity among the international youth! And they do recommend places to go in Brighton which makes a good starting point as there are a bewildering amount of establishments to try. There are more restaurants per head in Brighton and Hove than in any other place in the UK with a ratio of one restaurant for every 250 people. There’s also one drinking establishment for every 320 people with over 1,400 licensed premises. See what I mean.

So here’s what we did in our (just over) 24 hours on a bright Autumn day (and night) in Brighton.

Wandered along Brighton Pier

I love the striking whiteness of the Pier which is 524 metres long, though it seems much longer. Some sort of optical illusion?  It was designed by Richard St George Moore and work on it began in November 1881. It finally opened in a grand ceremony on 28 May 1899. The Pier is now a Grade II Listed building that has more than three million visitors a year. It looks particularly sparkly at night – with 60,000 twinkling light bulbs.

The arcade buzzes with people playing games, there are thrill rides at the end and there’s a range of quirky shops. And it’s fast-food heaven – from fish and chips, sausages, hot dogs, burgers, milkshakes, crepes and of course ice cream – there’s plenty to tuck into. The chips are particularly good and it seemed appropriate to wander the pier snacking on piping hot chips wrapped in paper and doused in vinegar. Trust me, you need to do it.

Brighton: Pier

Exploring the pier on a sunny autumn day

The vibrant colours of the carousel looked stunning alongside the blues of sea and sky.

Brighton: Carousel

One of the many ways to keep entertained on the Pier

Enjoyed a beach-side beverage

Brighton Beach is a pebbly one so not so great for walking along. No problem, there’s a long promenade alongside the beach to get a good helping of bracing sea air and some endorphin-inducing exercise.

The arches along the beachfront have been developed into shops selling everything from the work of local artists, clothes, jewellery, and various souvenirs. And of course, food and drinks, from luxury seafood to ice cream. We were there on a beautifully sunny autumn day so ordered coffee from one of the cafes to take away and sipped it sitting on the beach with views across the sea to the pier.

Brighton: the beach

Spend time beach-side enjoying the view

Promenaded the length of the beach

I’m a big fan of a seaside promenade and there’s plenty to see along the four miles between Brighton Marina and Hove Lagoon. Of course there’s the pier and towards the other end of the beach you’ll find the delightfully colourful beach huts that the area is famous for. The huts are much sought after – well, having a place to shelter even in the middle of the English summer makes sense. There are a couple for sale if you have a spare £18,000!

Brighton: beach huts

Its worth walking down towards Hove for a view of the beach huts

You’ll see the Victorian influence in the architecture everywhere in Brighton. I particularly love the seaside bandstand which first opened in 1884. It hosts a variety of bands every Sunday through the summer and is also available for hire as a wedding or party venue. Even when it’s empty I swear you can almost hear the music playing!

Brighton: Bandstand

The beautifully intricate bandstand

Ate lunch at Red Roaster 

Situated at the bottom of St James Street in Kemptown, Red Roaster is a bright, plant-filled contemporary space with a tasty selection of breakfast/brunch dishes, sandwiches and salads – and they serve great coffee.

Brighton: Red Roaster

The trendy, brightness of Red Roaster

Brighton: Red Roaster

Red Roaster’s scrumptious chicken burger with curly fries

Brighton: Red Roaster

Drink up: the freshness of elderflower and mint

Tucked into a luxurious breakfast at The Breakfast Club

So here’s another reason for a long morning promenade. So you have the excuse to tuck into one of The Breakfast Club’s substantial brekkies. It’s their first venture outside of London, like all of them doesn’t take bookings and is extremely popular. The no-booking system is one of my pet hates – but as it happens we only had to wait about 10 minutes before being ushered to a table in this cool venue. The menu makes your mouth water, really – it’s taking breakfast to a different level.

I tucked into this delightful bowl of chorizo hash: chorizo, grilled peppers, mushrooms, caramelised onions and crushed potatoes all topped with a soft poached egg and served with a lemon and feta sauce. Yummy, yummy, yummy, it tasted as good as it sounded.

Brighton: Breakfast Club

And how’s this for the ultimate comfort food. Disco fries! Bacon, beer cheese, fried eggs, skin on chips, chimichurri and spring onions. Seems likely this dish was invented as a hangover cure – think I need to go back with a hangover and test it out.
Brighton: The Breakfast Club

Marvelled at the Royal Pavilion

The spectacular structure that is the Royal Pavilion does look somewhat out of place in modern Brighton. It was built as a pleasure palace by the sea for King George IV and is a mix of Regency grandeur and the style of India and China. It’s said the Germans didn’t bomb Brighton in World War II because Hitler wanted the Royal Pavillion as his seaside home. Can’t blame him – it certainly has wow factor.

Brighton: Royal Pavilion

The sight of the beautiful pavilion always amazes me

Visited doughnut heaven

Dum Dum Donutterie is a sight to behold. There’s a variety of doughnuts and cronuts (a cross between a croissant and a doughnut) beyond your imagination. Like the Galaxy cronut that’s made of butter croissant dough filled with blackberry and lemon butter cream and finished with a swirled fondant. The doughnut selection comes in standard and mini sizes and includes the delectable creme brûlée and chocolate creme options. Eating doughnuts will never be the same again.

Brighton: Dum Dum Donutterie

An array of doughnuts and cronuts to delight

Brighton: Dum Dum donutterie

Ready to go with a bag of tasty takeaways

Meandered through The Lanes

This famous area of the city comprises a collection of narrow lanes, creating a maze of alleyways and small, quirky shops. At first it all seems a bit bewildering but you soon pinpoint landmarks and realise they are simpler to negotiate than you thought. Like Choccywoccydoodah where you can marvel over the fabulously creative chocolate creations.

Brighton: Lanes

A must-visit destination for chocolate lovers

Sampled fabulous ice cream

Well, you can’t go to the seaside and not have some ice cream can you? No matter what the season. It’s no exaggeration to say there’s ice cream everywhere you look in Brighton. We picked Boho Gelateri for its hand-made Italian ice cream and over 20 flavours to choose from.

Brighton: Boho Gelateri

Ice cream is compulsory at the seaside

Indulged in a meaty dinner at The Coal Shed

For dinner we decided on elegant steak restaurant The Coal Shed. They describe themselves as “born from the love of cooking on fire”. Perfect. The focus on top-quality ingredients means dishes are kept simple and arrive bursting with flavour.

Brighton: The Coal Shed

The welcoming frontage of The Coal Shed

The space is contemporary, yet cosy and the menu easy to negotiate. The Black Angus steak burger was served with Bourbon relish, lettuce, pickles, tomato, onion and chunky beef dripping chips.

Brighton: The Coal Shed

The tastiest of burgers with beef dripping chips

I headed straight for a classic – sirloin steak with bearnaise sauce – one of my absolute favourite combinations. The tastiest of sirloins cooked to perfection and the creamiest of bearnaise. What more could you want?

Brighton: The Coal Shed

The perfect medium-rare sirloin with sweet baby potatoes

Brighton’s the sort of place I want to keep going back to. I love exploring on foot and it’s a great town to walk around – and a great town to sit around in too! All those bars and restaurants in such a relatively small area – mind boggling!

Where to stay

We stayed at the New Steine Hotel which is in a lovely Victorian building on a stylish and quiet square, a very short walk from the beach with lovely sea views. It’s also handily close to everything –  shops, the Lanes, coffee shops, bars and restaurants.

Our ensuite twin room was very comfortable with modern British-themed decor (love a Union Jack), lovely crisp linen, tea-making facilities and a safe. All the essentials covered there.

There’s a great breakfast spread including a buffet and full cooked options.

Breakfast delights at La Bottega di Finestra in Prague

La Bottega di Finestra

Today we’re in Prague tucking into an energy-building brekkie before embarking on a walking tour of the city.

La Bottega is a  contemporary bistro and Italian deli with a dining area at the front where they serve breakfast, lunch and dinner. Tasty goodies on shelves and in cases surround you: bread and authentic Italian pastries baked fresh daily, home made pasta and desserts and chocolates.

At the back of the shop you’ll find fresh meat and veg daily, a fabulous array of salami, ham and cheese. And an impressive wine selection.

The breakfast menu offers old favourites and some different dishes, too. Starting with an Italian-style omelette with Fontina cheese, served with crispy bacon.

La Bottega di Finestra: omelette

Cheese omelette and crispy bacon

I went for the delightful-sounding three minute eggs in the glass with clarified butter and chives. Sort of like buttery boiled eggs without the shell – a perfect light breakfast treat.

La Bottega di Finestra: eggs in a glass

Delicate and buttery: eggs in a glass

Scrambled eggs came wrapped in marinated salmon. A classic.

La Bottega di Finestra: scrambled egg

Classic scrambled egg and smoked salmon

Or for a healthier option how about the banana omelette served with fresh fruit and greek yogurt. Novel idea!

La Bottega di Finestra: Banana omelette

An omelette of banana with fruit and yogurt

The coffee is fantastic here. Fresh and professionally made and presented. There’s also a lovely range of fresh juices – I had beetroot – sorry for not taking a picture of it. It was tasty and beautifully pink.

La Bottega di Finestra: cappuccino

Cappuccino that looks and tastes wonderful

Fresh loaves of bread are displayed on the counter to tempt you.

La Bottega di Finestra: bread

Bread is freshly baked daily

There’s a also a range of salads waiting for the lunch-time rush.

La Bottega di Finestra: salads

An array of freshly made salads

And of course traditional Italian sweetness.

La Bottega di Finestra: cakes

Tempting sweet treats in many colours

The interior is bright and contemporary with plenty of space for viewing the displays of wonderful offer and floor-to-ceiling windows giving you a great outdoor perspective, too.

La Bottega di Finestra: interior

The stylish interior lined with goodies

We liked Bottega di Finestra so much that we went back the next day. Its excellent food, friendly welcoming service and mouth-watering deli displays made it too good to resist.

Today’s price point

La Bottega is great value.

Breakfast dishes ranged from around £4-£7. A latte cost just over £2.

La Bottega di Finestra is at Platnerska 11, 11000 Praha 1

Great Italian on the river at CottoCrudo in Prague

Dining alfresco at CottoCrudo

It’s a cold, dank day in London so I’m transporting myself back to a warm August evening in Prague when we dined on the terrace of CottoCrudo. How I love a bit of al fresco dining.

CottoCrudo is in the rather swanky Four Seasons Hotel and the terrace overlooks the Vltava River. The extensive menu offers a range of Italian and Mediterranean-style dishes. Executive Chef Leonardo Di Clemente comes from an Italian farming family and his philosophy is to mix what he describes as “Mamma-style cuisine” with current culinary trends.

CottoCrudo literally means Cooked Raw and this is how the menu divides. The crudo section encompasses a set of mouthwatering raw fish dishes that it’s impossible to resist. All beautifully presented using the freshest of fresh produce. The most perfect start to a summer night’s dining.

What’s on the menu

Oysters were served with mango, cucumber and yuzu soya sauce. Fresh, zesty and gloriously tasting of the sea.

CottoCrudo: oysters

Luscious oysters with a zesty sauce

My tuna spaghetti was marinated with orange emulsion. Thin, spaghetti-shaped pieces of fish that melted in my mouth, made all the more tender by the fabulous citrussy marinade.

CottoCrudo: tuna

A glass full of delightful tuna spaghetti

Raw salmon was served with miso vinaigrette, frisbee salad and sprinkled with sesame seeds.

CottoCrudo: salmon

Delicate Asian-flavoured salmon

The richest of seared tuna carpaccio was served with Genova-style salad and smoked quail’s egg.

CottoCrudo: tuna carpaccio

A colourful collection of tasty morsels

For my second course I chose from the antipasti section. Described as Onsen poached egg with soft potato cream, porcini mushrooms and black truffle, it was hard to picture but I loved the sound of all the ingredients. And boy was I right. What a wonderful dish of softness and flavours.

In case you’re wondering an Onsen is a hot geothermal spring in Japan which is the perfect temperature for making slow-cooked, soft eggs left in the water for several hours. The principle has been transported to the kitchen where eggs are cooked at a low, controlled temperature for 45 to 90 minutes. Love a bit of science in my dinner!

Both this and the tuna spaghetti I had are CottoCrudo Signature dishes which I wasn’t even aware of when I ordered – well, they certainly were spectacular.

Truffly potato cream, egg and mushroom – a phenomenal dish

Saffron risotto was served with roasted seabags, buffalo mozzarella and green pea puree. The sweetness of the fish was perfect with the creaminess of the cheese and risotto. A classic Italian dish given a little bit extra.

CottoCrudo: risotto

Roasted seabass nestles on the saffron risotto

There seem to be a lot of truffles around in the Prague summer – good news for us all. This beautifully meaty dish of milk-fed veal tenderloin was served with foie gras, black truffle and mushroom puree.

CottoCrudo: Veal

Delicate veal with the earthy flavours of truffle and mushroom

CottoCrudo: petit fours

A tray of delicate petit fours to finish with

And here’s the wonderful red-rooftop view across the river.

CottoCrudo: terrace

Looking across the river to Prague Castle

CottoCrudo is certainly a glamorous place to dine. The food is excellent, the service impeccable and the attention to detail impressive. And the intimate little terrace does have great views.

Today’s price point

Being in the Four Seasons you’d expect prices to be on the steep side at CottoCrudo, but the food was actually pretty good value. Starters began at 220CZK (Czech Koruna) – about £7.50 and mains from 620CZK – around £21.

The extensive wine list was however rather on the expensive side with local wine going for around £40 a bottle and everything else for significantly more. We went Czech and weren’t disappointed.

CottoCrudo is in the Four Seasons Hotel at Veleslavinova 2a/1098, Praha I, Czech Republic.

Read more about what to do in the beautiful city of Prague by clicking here

Terasa u Zlate Studne: fabulous food overlooking the rooftops of Prague

It’s been a bit quiet on the blog front recently. I’ve been on my travels again and had family to stay, too, so I’ve had a wonderful time showing them around London – one of my absolute favourite things.

Well I’m back on the blog at last and today I’m taking you to a fabulous restaurant in beautiful Prague. Terasa u Zlate Studne is set on high just below the majestic Prague Castle, the stylish eatery is on the fourth floor of the Golden Well Hotel with a terrace looking over the characteristic red rooftops of Prague. Lunchtime spots really don’t get more perfect – it’s the sort of place where the happiness washes over you before you even sit at your beautifully laid table.

On the menu

And then there’s the food. The menu is so exciting to read and when the dishes arrive, they look like works of art. And they taste even better than they look. Seriously. I started with traditional Prague ham served with fine horseradish mousse and beetroot slices. Never has a plate of ham looked so exotic. The tasty little chunks of meat were perfectly matched with the crunch of the beetroot and radish and the bite of the horseradish.

Teresa u Zlate Studne

A beautiful plate of local ham

The scallop ceviche was served atop marinated cucumber with peach curb, peaches and a dollop of black caviar assetra. The freshest of fish that melted in the mouth, rounded off with tasty peach flavours and a salty caviar touch.

Terasa u Zlate Studne

Freshly sweet scallops with juicy fruit and salty caviar

The salad nicoise was made with yellow fin Ahi tuna slices and served with juicy black olives, boiled egg, tomato, crisp lettuce and roasted La Ratte potatoes. A classic salad transformed into a magical plate.

Terasa u Zlate Studne

Tuna nicoise that’s as pretty as a picture

The rich redness of the carpaccio came with creamy foam from ricotta cheese, spring vegetables and lime cucumber jelly.

Terasa u Zlate Studne

Carpaccio: Vivid, rich and beautifully presented

Duck liver terrine of foie gras was served with wonderfully luscious smoked duck breast, marinated chanterelles and wild berries curd. A real indulgent dish served beautifully displayed…again.

Terasa u Zlate Studne

Foie Gras and Brioche – a match made in heaven

Tartar from milk-fed veal was stuffed with goat cheese and accompanied with wild caper and sundried Sicilian tomatoes and a glass egg yolk. A riot of colours and flavours.

Terasa u Zlate Studne

Tastily tender veal tartar

The best array of starters I’ve seen for a very long time – everyone was totally delighted with their choices. And boy were we excited to tuck into our mains.

The signature meal was too good to resist. A generous portion of Royal steak from Argentinian breed Angus was served topped with foie gras, asparagus and baby vegetables on a bed of velvety potato puree with truffles from Piemonte and a Baron Philippe de Rothschild Sauternes Sauce. Wow what a treat – beautifully truffle-y and satisfyingly rich.

Terasa U Zlate Studne

The luxuriously indulgent signature meal

The earthy wild mushroom risotto was a satisfyingly creamy dish.

Terasa

Classically creamy mushroom risotto

I ordered my main course off the starters section as it sounded too good to resist – and what a good decision it turned out to be. The trio of tuna came beautifully presented in six different sections, just to make it easy to know what goes with what. The tartar was topped with a poached quail egg and served with cress, the stunning tataki with white radish and the skewer with teriyaki sauce and pungent wasabi. This could be my favourite dish of the year, which is saying something – I’ve sample plenty!

 

Teresa u Zlate Studne

Spectacular tuna in three forms

And here’s the terrace overlooking the red rooves of Prague. A nicer spot for lunch is hard to find.

Today’s price point

Terasa u Zlate Studne is not the place for a cheap lunch, but it’s certainly good value as the cuisine is fabulous. We paid £390 for a lunch for six which included pre-lunch drinks, two courses and two bottles of wine. Of that the Signature Meal cost £47. A real treat to have.

Terasa u Zlate Studne is at U Zlate Studne 166/4, 11800, Prague, Czech Republic.

Flavour Bastard in Soho for something completely different

Flavour Bastard – now there’s a memorable name for a restaurant. When I recommended some new openings for a night out with friends I think they chose this one purely on the name alone!

A quick perusal of their website also added intrigue when I read their statement. “Take vibrant flavours from around the world, remove rules and traditions, add a bit of mischief and creativity and you have Flavour Bastard – a story of flavours running away from home.”

I like the idea of flavours running away from home, but with no rules or traditions and some mischief added in it all was starting to sound a little chaotic. And the menu certainly makes for interesting reading. Each dish is an adventure and you really don’t know what to expect until the plate is placed in front of you.

This is not always a good thing, though I’m happy to report it works at Flavour Bastard. We had plates of food that seemed to be a mix of many different cuisines that looked and tasted delightful.

Like these doughnuts from the Tiny Plate section (it’s all meant to be food to share), made with white lentils, chorizo and pecorino. Have you ever? Best doughnuts I’ve ever had and don’t they look stunning?

Flavour Bastard: doughnuts

My favourite doughnuts ever

The next section is entitled Small plates – though don’t be alarmed, they aren’t that small. This amazing concoction is smoked goat, pomegranate and frankincense with orange and tarragon. Almost sounds like something from another solar system! I’m quite partial to a bit of goat, though have never had the smoked sort before. It was lovely – very tender and, well, smokey.

Flavour Bastard: smoked goat

Smoked goat with exotic fruity flavours

Egg-related dishes pop up on many menus these days and I’m always surprised at what people combine with the humble egg with amazing results. Today our duck egg was served with triple cauliflower and pickled watermelon. As I recently discovered on my visit to Poland you can pretty much pickle anything – and pickled watermelon is surprisingly good.

Flavour Bastard: duck egg

Duck egg with a cauliflower and watermelon extravaganza

I’ve been having a bit of a mussel run at the moment – sometimes I just feel like them more than others – and today’s were Caribbean-style with jerk spices, rum and scotch bonnet. You see, I told you there were flavours from all over the world to look forward to. The broth was light and spicy, perfect with the sweet plump mussels.

Flavour Bastard: mussels

Mussels with a flavour of the Caribbean

So we’ve enjoyed doughnuts like you’ve never seem before…how about some unique popcorn. This is a dish of roast sweet potato, fennel, yogurt, sunflower seeds and chilli popcorn. Who’d have thought of putting all those ingredients together? It worked – and created a pleasant mix of tastes and textures.

Flavour Bastard: Chilli popcorn

Chilli popcorn adds bite to sweet potato

And now time for dessert. First up the Flavour Bastard version of that Spanish staple – Churros. I’ve eaten my share of these in markets in Spain and today’s offering came with some spectacular rose petal ice cream.

Flavour Bastard: Churros

Churros with incredible ice cream

Then there’s the Mayan-spiced milk chocolate and brownie mousse served with lavender ice cream. I must admit to a growing love for spiced or herby ice creams. This is a seriously rich desert made for true chocolate lovers.

Flavour Bastard: Brownies

The most chocolatey of brownies

This is one chef with some serious imagination. He’s called Pratap Chahal and has previously been at Chez Bruce, Cinnamon Club and Claridges. I reckon there’s a lot of experimenting going on in that kitchen! It’s the sort of restaurant where I’d recommend you hold onto a menu so you can double check your dishes when they arrive – to help place all those ingredients – some of which have probably never been mixed before. I  know that some people find this annoying, today I found it fascinating because, somehow, the combinations worked. Flavour Bastard is certainly memorable – and that’s not just the name.

Flavour Bastard: Room

Start the evening pondering the menu with a glass of sparkling

Today’s price point

The food at Flavour Bastard is very reasonably priced.

We paid £44.50 for our seven dishes, which were plenty for three ladies.

There’s a comprehensive and highly international wine list with reds and whites starting from £20.

Flavour Bastard is at 63-64 Frith Street, Soho, W1.

More sights and flavours of Krakow

Although my stay in Krakow was fairly brief, and seemed even more so with two trips out of   the city to visit the Wieliczka Salt Mine and Auschwitz-Birkenau, there was still time to get a good flavour of the city. There’s lots to see and plenty of good food in Krakow. You can read about our great night at the Copernicus by clicking here.

On our final night we headed to the city’s main square. Rynek Glowny dates back to the 13th century and covers over 9 acres, making it one of the largest medieval town squares in Europe. It’s surrounded by stylish townhouses and dominated by the Cloth Hall which was originally a hub of trading. You’ll also see the Town Hall Tower and two churches, including the beautiful Gothic towers of St Mary’s Basilica.

Krakow: Rynek Glowny

The towers dominate the skyline of this grand square

All commercial activity took place in this square and it was where regal ceremonies were held as well as public executions. Now it’s the place to head for that all-important souvenir shopping, to taste some local street food and to find a wide selection of bars and restaurants. It’s a stylish square and there’s plenty of entertainment on offer in the evenings with buskers and traditional dancers, as well as lots of traditional wares for sale.

After a pleasant meander, our final destination was the stylish Szara Ges. A modern space offering great views of the square’s grandeur and delicious contemporary Polish food.

As the logo hints at, their speciality is goose, so I couldn’t resist the foie gras. Not just any old foie gras though, ice cream made from foie gras and served with macerated figs and cherries and Tokaj grape jelly. Some wonderfully soft and sweet brioche completed the dish perfectly. I feel I’m going to be searching for foie gras ice cream for a long time now, trouble is I’m really not sure how many places I’m going to be able to find it in.

Krakow: Szara Ges

Inventive and tasty foie gras ice cream to start with

The second starter enjoyed by our group involved beetroot. Well, there would have to be a beetroot option, we are in Poland after all. My brother Frank (who I’ve mentioned before has always had a strong dislike of beetroot…until now) actually ordered it. So much has Poland made him fall in love with the humble beet! It was described as goat’s cheese, baked pepper marmalade and beet leaves in beet ash. Looks beautiful and he was still talking about how wonderful it tasted days later.

Krakow: Szara Ges

The vibrancy of beets and their ash

I ordered another starter as my main course – a handy trick when you’re on a eating holiday. The gravlax was macerated in salt and served with homemade creme fraiche and dill and topped with crisp, peppery radishes. A beautifully dense piece of fish packed with flavour and spiciness.

Krakow: Szara Ges

Sweet and spicy gravlax

The beef fillet was served with goose potato tagliatelle – more of that goose theme – with the crispy shreds of potatoes fried in that most delicious of all fat, and a green peppercorn sauce.

Krakow: Szara Ges

Beef fillet nestles under crispy potato

The cod fillet mignon was grilled and served with zucchini puree and crayfish. A delicate fish dish to savour.

Krakow: Szara Ges

Grilled cod with a delightful sauce

And of course, there would have to be a duck dish. The duck in Poland comes highly recommended by me! Served beautifully rare it came with cauliflower and liquified foie gras. Fabulous.

Krakow: Szara Ges

The tenderest of duck dishes with liquid foie gras

After dinner while we were pondering dessert we sampled a couple of vodkas on recommendation of our lovely waiter.

Krakow: Szara Ges

When in Poland…drink vodka

This dessert was called Copernicus. Nicolaus Copernicus was a Polish scholar who formulated a model of the universe that placed the sun at the centre of the universe rather than the sun – a somewhat radical theory at the time. His father was from Krakow. And this dish portrays the sun at the centre with the other planets orbiting around it.

Zsara Ges: dessert

The beautifully yellow and chocolate dessert

Eating at Szara Ges was a lovely experience. The service was welcoming and expert without being too overwhelming and it was perfect to be in the heart of all the night time activity.

Szarages is at Rynek Glowny 17, in Krakow’s main square.

Dining Squares

Rynek Glowny is lined with bars and restaurants on all sides serving a mix of Polish, Italian and eclectic dishes. I enjoyed this delicious duck breast with cherry sauce, apple and roast potatoes.

Krakow: Rynek Glowny

Duck is a Polish speciality

You’ll find plenty of Polish delicacies in the bustling market in the centre of the square.

Krakow: Rynek Glowny

Exotic-looking sheeps cheese

We loved these deliciously smoky cheese bites cooked on the grill with bacon. It’s called Oscypek and is made in the mountains where it’s cured in hot smoke for up to 14 days. It’s seriously smoky with a tasty, unique flavour.

Krakow: Rynek Glowny

Polish Oscypek – smoked mountain cheese

And then there’s the square in the Kazimierz, the Old Jewish Quarter, again offering a range of places to enjoy food and beverages. We tasted the delicious local dumplings (pierogi) served with a creamy sauce.

Krakow: Kazimierz

More dumpling delight – and a creamy sauce

If you want to do a tour of the city in what I would describe as a golf buggy, there are plenty available for hire in both squares. They all come with a recorded, informative commentary. It’s a fun way to see the three main historic areas – the Old Town, Kazimierz (the Old Jewish Quarter) and the Krakow Ghetto where Schindler’s factory is.

And another thing

You can’t go to Krakow and not visit the Wieliczka Salt Mines. Just half an hour’s drive away they are an absolute wonder. You climb down hundreds of stairs and meander through a world of salt – it needs to be seen to be believed. There’s a large ballroom area where the chandeliers are made of salt crystals, beautifully lit underground lakes, salt statues and an explanation of how everything worked in the days when salt was an expensive commodity and it was prestigious (and well paid) to work here. One of the best strangely unusual things I’ve ever done, if that makes any sense at all.

Krakow: Wuekuczja Salt Mine

Stunning salt chandeliers

Where to stay

We stayed at the Metropolitan Boutique Hotel which is a five minute walk from Kazimierz and less than 15 to Rynek Glowny. It’s a modern hotel with beautifully comfortable rooms, a cosy dining room where you have your delicious breakfast spread and a lovely little courtyard.

The dining room turns into their Fab Fusion restaurant at night where you can enjoy an interesting selection of dishes with a mix of Italian, Asian and Polish flavours.

We organised all our excursions through the hotel. The service was fantastic, helpful, efficient and friendly. Everyone really made an effort to make us feel immediately at home. Which we did!

Oh and there’s a Biedronka opposite (it means ladybird in Polish, they have the cutest logo) – and it’s a supermarket. Always handy.

The Metropolitan is at ul Berka Jaseluricza 19, Krakow